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Copyright  2001 McGraw-Hill Ryerson
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Student Centre Canadian Organizational Behaviour
Fourth Edition
Steven L. McShane

Student Centre

Chapter 8: Communicating in Organizational Settings

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    Self-Assessment

    Active Listening Skills Inventory
    PURPOSE: This self-assessment is designed to help you estimate your strengths and weaknesses on various dimensions of active listening.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Think back to face-to-face conversations you have had with a co-worker or client in the office, hallway, factory floor, or other setting. Indicate the extent to which each item below describes your behaviour during those conversations. Answer each item as truthfully as possible so that you can get an accurate estimate of where your active listening skills need improvement. Then click the 'Score' button to calculate your results for each scale. This exercise is completed alone so students can assess themselves honestly without concerns of social comparison. However, class discussion will focus on the important elements of active listening.

    1. I keep an open mind about the speaker's point of view until he or she has finished talking.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    2. While listening, I mentally sort out the speaker's ideas in a way that makes sense to me.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    3. I stop the speaker and give my opinion when I disagree with something he or she has said.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    4. People can often tell when I'm not concentrating on what they are saying.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    5. I don't evaluate what a person is saying until he or she has finished talking.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    6. When someone takes a long time to present a simple idea, I let my mind wander to other things.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    7. I jump into conversations to present my views rather than wait and risk forgetting what I wanted to say.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    8. I nod my head and make other gestures to show that I'm interested in the conversation.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    9. I can usually stay focused on what people are saying to me even when they don't sound interesting.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    10. Rather than organizing the speaker's ideas, I usually expect the person to summarize them for me.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    11. I always say things like "I see" or "uh-huh" so people know that I'm really listening to them.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    12. While listening, I concentrate on what is being said and regularly organize the information.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    13. While the speaker is talking, I quickly determine whether I like or dislike his or her ideas.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    14. I pay close attention to what people are saying even when they are explaining something I already know.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    15. I don't give my opinion until I'm sure that the other person has finished talking.

    Not at all
    A little
    Somewhat
    Very much

    © Copyright 2000 Steven L. McShane


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